Power conditioner - Shindo Laboratory - Mr T

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Availability: on request

Shindo Mr T sole power-conditioning product is an isolation transformer, a category of product common in industrial settings and product-testing facilities. The simplest and arguably most common sort of isolation transformer is one in which incoming AC current is applied to a primary coil, with a secondary coil attached to one or more AC outlets; the turns ratio between the two coils is 1 to 1, thus ensuring that x number of volts in will result in the same number out. Of course that never quite happens, owing to various insertion losses; in particular, transformer windings can always be counted on to try to vibrate, thus turning at least a small portion of the electrical input into heat and/or mechanical noise. AC is sent from the primary to the secondary coil by means of electromagnetic induction—the operating principle of any sort of transformer.

The object for such a transformer would be complete electrical isolation of one or more AC-powered devices from a generator or public utility, typically in an effort to protect the former from possible ground faults in the latter—or, where such dangers exist, from DC. And though it’s a matter of debate among engineers, it’s reasonable to expect an isolation transformer to offer a degree of protection from some types of power surges caused by lightning, which is predominantly DC.

Shindo Laboratory’s Mr. T is an isolation transformer of the noise-reducing sort, as opposed to the sort designed solely for safety; indeed, unlike transformers built primarily for galvanic isolation, the ground tab on the Mr. T’s AC inlet is wired to the ground tabs of its six AC outlets. (Then again, that’s irrelevant in light of the fact that the power cords supplied with all Shindo products, including the Mr. T, have plugs with just two prongs: one for live, one for neutral, nothing for ground.)

Inside the Mr. T is a massive Haruna Denki transformer. Its width and height barely fit inside Shindo’s steel enclosure. The box leaves just enough room for the front panel’s power switch and LED power indicator; the rear panel’s chunky Meikosha AC outlets, plus nondescript IEC socket and fuse holder; and the necessary hookup wiring. The case is beautifully finished, inside and out, in Shindo’s trademark shade of green, and it’s solidly built—its removable top, damped with a rubber-like pad, is held in place with 10 machine screws, the holes for which line up perfectly with those on the main enclosure.

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